February 23, 2016

I have a new graduate student...Now what?




So... exciting news for me... I took on my first graduate student this semester! Wow, it's kind of a shock for me too.  I had always promised myself that I would wait until I'd been out of school for approximately ~5 years before taking on a student, but the local university contacted my school system in a desperate need for a supervisor and I happily said 'yes.'

When I was an (online) student, I was in charge of securing my own externships, which was extremely difficulty and frustrating, but I was lucky that there were some opportunities and, more importantly, people who stepped in to lend a helping hand to mentor me and allow me to graduate in time.  I figured that any way that I could 'pay it forward' to others, I would any chance I could get.

So now I have a student, and since this is my first experience with this process, I'd like to share some of the things I have done to really assist this process for me AND my graduate clinician.
I started with one of the best resources I could find by the Speech Bubble: Student and Supervisor SLP Organization Binder. After I printed out all of my goodies, my clinician and I sat together to review the contents and make edits to suit our situation and timeline.



Next, once we figured out what kind of schedule she would operate from, I took a look at which students she would be interacting with the most frequently and prepared an IEP at a glance binder for her to review the students profile pages and annual goals.

Another helpful resource that I shared with my student is another item that I use quite frequently. Actually, there are 2 of them. Right now, schools are all about the Common Core Standards (CCS).  Some handy resources includes the following: The Common Core Reference Binder by Speechy Musings and the K-5 Common Core Standards Supporting IEP Goals by Nicole Allison.  We also want to make sure we are effectively using evidence-based practices and another handy reference is the Evidence-Based Practice Guide by Carissa Ten Hoeve.  I sure wish these resources were around when I was a graduate student!

I also shared with her my personal, professional SLP portfolio binder (by Nicole Allison on TPT).  Inside it references my teaching and therapy style, approach to paperwork and logistics, and samples of my work. That way she could see how I present myself to my administrators to better assist them (and her) in understanding how I operate my classroom and manage therapy.


I hope these links and resources have been helpful to you if you are considering the option of taking on a new student clinician.  I know that I wanted to help mentor others in the ways that I got as a student and it feels very enriching and rewarding to help another grow professionally, clinically, and personally.  

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